One year later…

A year ago I was about to graduate from Teacher Training.

A year ago I decided I was going to leave my job, I couldn’t tell much people. I told one by one. And I took the Ohs and Ahs as they came. And then I told them I was going to leave anyway. 

One year ago I went into survival mode: If I don’t do this now, I will die.

A year ago I felt strong and alive and happy, and I felt like this would last forever. And although I don’t always feel strong, I do feel alive and happy, and it has lasted forever (so far).

A year ago I was trying to put together a plan. I didn’t see the upside up or the upside down, I didn’t see a side at all. It was like a huge marble block, with my statue waiting inside for me to carve it. I knew I wanted to quit working like I was, at the same time work kept coming and I kept doing it to the best of my ability, but it lacked heart. I didn’t find anything in it that I would want to continue doing it for.

On the other hand, yoga, gave me all the energy I needed to go through that wave. It was like filling my lungs with air before the next one. About the same time last year, I started adjusting people in class to assist other teachers. I started knowing my shit (or at least I thought I did). I started feeling confident and got every single day a confirmation, this is what I want to do. Everyone started asking me if I would open a studio after teacher training. And also after the diving certification, will you open a diving school?. But that would have been like opening a heart surgery hospital after the first year of medical school. 

A year ago I was about to go home to Mexico for my 30th bday. I was planning a party with friends and family and I was planning my Rescue Diver cert. I was booking a house on the beach in Mexico for holidays with my family. I was looking forward to get in the water and dive. I didn’t know I could be an instructor. I didn’t know I wanted to, and I didn’t know I would. I still don’t know if I will. But I want to.

A year ago I started researching Indonesia. And Indonesia kept popping up, at the dentist’s cabinet in the magazines of the waiting room. My colleagues talked to me about it. It just kept flashing at me. I didn’t know I would go, and I didn’t know I would want to go back. And I still don’t know if I will. But I want to.

One year later, I have been teaching yoga for (almost) a year. I have done the Rescue Diver cert. I spent 2 months in Indonesia, studying yoga, drinking green juices, downing every single coconut that got in my way and doing my Divemaster certification. So much has happened and I am about to get on a flight to Mexico again, to dive, again, to do yoga, again.

One year later I want to speak about the transformation that I went through ever since yoga touched me. And today, during a class some students adjusted me, and I could feel their inexperience,their raw sweet intention, their beautiful lack of precision, and it filled me with awe, I saw myself in them, I saw myself a year ago. When I was scared to touch people’s feet. When I thought the students were more advanced than me and I wouldn’t adjust them, because they looked so sure of themselves. I saw the hesitation, and the stuttering of their moves. I saw them, the way I felt a year ago, about to adjust someone, and then backing up, maybe thinking, it’s too late, or rather not.

I felt their lose touch, and I wanted to tell them this:

Your touch will become firm, your thoughts will become sharp, you will control time, and rhythm, your students will follow, your class will be full, you will sweat, you will cry, and laugh. And one day someone will ask you questions,and you won’t know the answers, or some you will, but not all. One day, a year after, you will look behind you and you will see a trainee thinking if they should adjust you. One day, in a year or so, you will realise a year has gone by, and you are your true self, sharing your love through yoga. One year later you will laugh when you make a mistake, you will improvise when you forget, you will touch people and when you will do so, you will ground them if they are missing that, you will give them balance, if they are missing that, you will give them security, if they don’t have that. You will touch a student and you both will become one, like the horse and the jockey, it’s not the horse who jumps, it’s not the jockey either, it’s both. In this same way you will make your students fly. You will talk to them about your weaknesses, and your strengths, you will be open and reassured, that everything is going to be ok. Do not be afraid, you chose this path. Don’t doubt yourself. Be yourself. And remember, before assisting another passenger, place the mask over your mouth first. If you are not grounded, if you are not strong, if you are not stable, when you touch your student you will transmit it, so every time you approach, find that split of a second, to place both feet on the ground, use your bandhas, and then take their hand and show them the way. You are already amazing. And I hope you see yourself as amazing as I see you today.

I am far from being perfect, the way it is supposed to be, but it is now one year later… 

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That’s your prayer

A while back I had surgery for the first time in my life. As I was in recovery at the hospital, a volunteer came to my room to ask me if I would like to pray. I welcomed the lady in my room, although I had no immediate desire to recite any of the few catholic prayers that I know (or used to know). I could have said no, thank you, but I listened.

For me praying became yoga. And yoga became my prayer. My practice is my prayer. The one repetitive mantra that calms me and soothes me, my breath is the music. I connect.

But I didn’t think explaining this to the lady would make sense. Already my friends don’t understand my journey well sometimes, and people think my yoga practice is a bit of a sect-related activity. I let the lady sit down and then she asked me how I was doing. She asked me: will you be alright? I told her I am alright and explained I was on my way out. She looked relieved. And she said, well, that’s no impediment to pray.

I put my best face and gathered courage to tell her that I don’t practice religion and haven’t practiced in a long time, that it was a choice and I am happy with it, and that I am not a catholic, nor I want to be one, or like someone told me once: I am a catholic in recovery. I was raised catholic but I have chosen to stop practicing, and I do not follow the religion anymore.

I felt a little sad that I had to tell her all this.

I think I was more afraid of her answer than my own statement. I thought she would try to convince me. And I would have to defend my view, and justify myself and all that.

She asked me: Is there any moment during the day, when you feel joy, when you look at someone, or something, and you are trully happy to be alive, when you feel awake and you realise how blessed you are? Is there a moment of joy like this in your life? Do you believe in god?

Yes, every time I look outside, I feel blessed. I feel happy that I can enjoy my life as I do. I find joy in the flowers when I walk on the street. I feel joy when I am with the people I love. When I feel the wind on my face, and I’m cold, or warm, I feel alive, I am alive, bliss. There is not one day that goes through, that I do not feel this joy. I am not sure I believe in God, but I believe in something.

She said: Well… maybe, THAT, is your prayer.

I didn’t do it for the animals.

The first thing I read this morning was an article about veganism and how a plant based diet has the possibility to cure diabetes. And I wanted to say something about myself, that maybe you already know. 

I switched to a vegan diet in 2012. The worse year of my life. The wake up call.

First I did it because I was ill. I spent several months with almost no energy to get out of bed and thinking I was about to live a painful life forever, my joints used to hurt as if I has needles stuck between them. And I wasn’t even 30. I went vegan and have been back and forth from vegetarian to vegan for a year and a half (I have made exceptions when I considered it appropriate and most times I did this my body had something to say afterwards), I started experimenting, listening, changing, trying to maintain a vegan diet while keeping my social life active (which is very difficult when everything served has bacon or cheese in it and when you order a vegetarian salad people ask you if you want chicken to go with it) and tolerating the comments and judgments from people around me (and also experiencing love from people who understand and support me and make an effort to avoid losing our friendship because of food).

A week after I started being a vegan the pain associated with my disease had cleared 80%. I now very rarely feel any discomfort, I have more energy than I ever had, I feel awake and happy, and strong. I feel good about myself and what I do.

A year after, I haven’t had any crisis or flare ups. I am healthy. In case you’re worried about my protein I can say I am strong and I get enough vegetable protein from delicious food that I cook. My skin is healthy, my muscles have grown and toned. I am a yoga student and a diver. I practice. I dive. I work. I travel. I party. My blood work is only lacking vitamin D (in Belgium, really?).

I didn’t do it for the animals. But in the end you know what? It feels good to know that what I put in my body is alive and didn’t scream with rage before being slaughtered. It feels good to know that I am doing some good and less harm. That my eating habits contribute to the planet, just like sorting waste does, just like not littering does, just like not killing does.

It came as a by product to my vegetarian/vegan diet: I am doing less harm. Ahimsa. As a yogi there is no way to deny it. You can accept your responsibility, and decide not to comply with this principle, we are all free to do that, you can also decide to get in fights with your neighbor, to be envious of your friend, to be unhappy with what you have, you can decide to live in the past and not stay in the moment, you can do any of this, accept your responsibility, and live like that, no one is perfect and we all go through that in different ways and different moments of our life. What we cannot do is deny it. Becase we know. Ahimsa means doing less harm. And eating animals does not do less harm. It does more.

As a side note, although I have no evidence that vegans are more bendy (and I haven’t done any research on that) I would put money on it. If you want to improve flexibility try a vegan diet for a month while you practice daily. You will tell me what happens. I really want to know.

 

Namaste!

Time, Space, Energy…

I don’t know where to begin. Most probably from now on my posts will be random scripts of what I go through during the trip and not a chronological account of the events. But in the end time doesn’t matter much, simply because time has become a different dimension for me in the last weeks. Let’s not start from the beginning.

I am writing about time because I think it’s the one thing that stroke me once all the excitement of the new place had washed off a bit. I started realising that time can be a pleasant companion instead of a cruel guardian. Being in Ubud I have spent the last weeks without the leash of time. It has not been “lunch-time” or “bed-time”, except for the wakeup time for yoga I pretty much have not had to do anything specific at any given time. What a bliss and I kid you not, the day you start eating when you’re hungry, sleeping when you’re tired, going out when you need air, staying in if you need a moment, seeing people if you feel like a chat, things change dramatically. I do not know how it happens but responding naturally to the demands of body and mind makes me free. Why should we all eat at the same time? Appart from being a social activity on top of a nourishing-nutrition-survival-etc one, why should we all keep the loyalty to the clock? Why if our bodies are different and need different amounts of anything, should we be doing the same things at the same time? How have we become the clockwork machine that tells us at what time of the day we should move our bowels? Or drink water? or take a nap? I have heard of kindergarden schools where kids are all brought to the potty at 11am, what in the world is wrong with the world. I get we all need maybe a little routine, but you will excuse me and I will say it, the world would be much better if we made some little changes. Call me a hippie, whatever, I went to a Montessori school, and I took naps whenever I felt tired, and I survived the real world very fine, so I can take it.

Being in Ubud makes me get in touch with those basic things I had put away because the system and the work life and the way we handle life in the big city with the big job and all those big things I was bound to believe I wanted. I actually do not miss any of those things, I barely remember them. And people ask why Bali is sort of the spiritual capital of the world (?), well, I am starting to understand and the similarities with my hometown are astonishing.

People need a place, time and energy do find themselves. If you don’t have time, or make time, or give yourself time, the finding yourself is not going to happen unless you are already quite high in the mental-spiritual plan. But if you don’t “have” time for the spiritual, it is very likely you don’t have time for your body too, and I don’t mean going to the gym one hour every second day. I mean taking time to take care of your food, or preparing it, of eating it, of disposing of it. If you don’t have space, as in an area where you live, enjoy, rest, a spot, a haven from the outside world, your cove, your tree which you climb up to hear the birds. If you don’t have a spot you enjoy then the surroundings are likely to be very toxic for you, there is no space for the CO2 to go our of your system and you accumulate it all thinking every day: I hope I win the lottery and I can buy a deserted island in the pacific where no one will ever find me again. Energy. Well this one is the toughest one. We are energy, and we can leak it, or we can produce it, and recycle it, we can take it from others, and we can give it to others, and we can share it. If you don’t have physical energy you’re probably not feeding your body enough, or with the quality it needs. If you are but you are still tired then you are probably spending that energy in the wrong things, or you are having others drain it away from you without noticing. Or maybe you are caught up in negative thoughts and negative waves that diminish the energy that would otherwise be multiplied if you were investing it in good things.

So what happens in these magical villages where foreigners arrive one day, find their peace in the jungle (beach/forest/mountain) and then call all their friends turning it into a sarong best-seller town, overcrowded with barefoot vegan hippies with unshaved armpits and overly long hair, who give free hugs and smell like garlic and lavender? Well, it’s not ONLY that. These kind of places offer a lack of judgement in the form of i-can-be-anything-i-want and that is something hard to get, at least for me, in a place where everybody knows me. a.k.a Home (Home in Mexico). So that gives me space. When you come down here and you get to meet people who are also trying to find themselves you offer them the same benefit, you don’t know who they are, actually maybe you don’t care, you don’t ask questions, you don’t ask them what is their vision of themselves in the long term, or what are they going to do as they are now unemployed, you don’t judge, you just drink your green juice and wish them the best. Also the space with a swimming pool is a very nice space to look for oneself, I must admit, let’s be no fools, it could be worse.

Time. I quit my job and have been unemployed for little over one month. It’s not half as scary as everyone said it would be. I don’t have an infinite pool of money and I don’t have rich parents-husband-sponsor that will keep me living the good life forever without lifting a finger. BUT. I have taken time off life as I knew it. I have taken time for me, and I have ran away with myself, to ask myself all the questions and evaluate the answers, to get inspired, to see beautiful things, to have amazing encounters with people, to eat vegan cake, to talk with nature, with the sea, I know running away is highly criticised but I encourage everyone, at least one time in your life, to run away (as long as it is with yourself).

Energy! I don’t remember being as tired as I was through 2012 and 2013. In my whole life. Fatigue and tiredness that made me want to go back to bed the minute I woke up. My body had no energy most of the time. It was a large effort to keep me afloat and I managed ok but thanks to a strong will and a stubborn personality (together with some sugared-up cake). Yoga though was the best part of my day but it seemed like I was a boat, with a leak, and I was sinking. Most times I just wanted to go to bed. In the last month I have slept long and deep. I have taken naps. I have stocked up on energy and I am learning to use it properly. I do not want to go back to bed right now. And that feels pretty awesome! The best is that I am able to share that with others. And I am also learning to differentiate tiredness with lack of energy.

I am truly grateful for all that I am living, and I am happy to share it with anyone who wants to know how I did it, to take this time, to set myself free, to “quit” and go, it was actually quite easy now that I think about it. If you’re thinking about it and want to ask me practical questions please do contact me. And if you feel like following my trip with images you can follow me on Instagram @igoyoga

Namaste!

Tamara

Time, Space, Energy…

I don’t know where to begin. Most probably from now on my posts will be random scripts of what I go through during the trip and not a chronological account of the events. But in the end time doesn’t matter much, simply because time has become a different dimension for me in the last weeks. Let’s not start from the beginning.

I am writing about time because I think it’s the one thing that stroke me once all the excitement of the new place had washed off a bit. I started realising that time can be a pleasant companion instead of a cruel guardian. Being in Ubud I have spent the last weeks without the leash of time. It has not been “lunch-time” or “bed-time”, except for the wakeup time for yoga I pretty much have not had to do anything specific at any given time. What a bliss and I kid you not, the day you start eating when you’re hungry, sleeping when you’re tired, going out when you need air, staying in if you need a moment, seeing people if you feel like a chat, things change dramatically. I do not know how it happens but responding naturally to the demands of body and mind makes me free. Why should we all eat at the same time? Appart from being a social activity on top of a nourishing-nutrition-survival-etc one, why should we all keep the loyalty to the clock? Why if our bodies are different and need different amounts of anything, should we be doing the same things at the same time? How have we become the clockwork machine that tells us at what time of the day we should move our bowels? Or drink water? or take a nap? I have heard of kindergarden schools where kids are all brought to the potty at 11am, what in the world is wrong with the world. I get we all need maybe a little routine, but you will excuse me and I will say it, the world would be much better if we made some little changes. Call me a hippie, whatever, I went to a Montessori school, and I took naps whenever I felt tired, and I survived the real world very fine, so I can take it.

Being in Ubud makes me get in touch with those basic things I had put away because the system and the work life and the way we handle life in the big city with the big job and all those big things I was bound to believe I wanted. I actually do not miss any of those things, I barely remember them. And people ask why Bali is sort of the spiritual capital of the world (?), well, I am starting to understand and the similarities with my hometown are astonishing.

People need a place, time and energy do find themselves. If you don’t have time, or make time, or give yourself time, the finding yourself is not going to happen unless you are already quite high in the mental-spiritual plan. But if you don’t “have” time for the spiritual, it is very likely you don’t have time for your body too, and I don’t mean going to the gym one hour every second day. I mean taking time to take care of your food, or preparing it, of eating it, of disposing of it. If you don’t have space, as in an area where you live, enjoy, rest, a spot, a haven from the outside world, your cove, your tree which you climb up to hear the birds. If you don’t have a spot you enjoy then the surroundings are likely to be very toxic for you, there is no space for the CO2 to go our of your system and you accumulate it all thinking every day: I hope I win the lottery and I can buy a deserted island in the pacific where no one will ever find me again. Energy. Well this one is the toughest one. We are energy, and we can leak it, or we can produce it, and recycle it, we can take it from others, and we can give it to others, and we can share it. If you don’t have physical energy you’re probably not feeding your body enough, or with the quality it needs. If you are but you are still tired then you are probably spending that energy in the wrong things, or you are having others drain it away from you without noticing. Or maybe you are caught up in negative thoughts and negative waves that diminish the energy that would otherwise be multiplied if you were investing it in good things.

So what happens in these magical villages where foreigners arrive one day, find their peace in the jungle (beach/forest/mountain) and then call all their friends turning it into a sarong best-seller town, overcrowded with barefoot vegan hippies with unshaved armpits and overly long hair, who give free hugs and smell like garlic and lavender? Well, it’s not ONLY that. These kind of places offer a lack of judgement in the form of i-can-be-anything-i-want and that is something hard to get, at least for me, in a place where everybody knows me. a.k.a Home (Home in Mexico). So that gives me space. When you come down here and you get to meet people who are also trying to find themselves you offer them the same benefit, you don’t know who they are, actually maybe you don’t care, you don’t ask questions, you don’t ask them what is their vision of themselves in the long term, or what are they going to do as they are now unemployed, you don’t judge, you just drink your green juice and wish them the best. Also the space with a swimming pool is a very nice space to look for oneself, I must admit, let’s be no fools, it could be worse.

Time. I quit my job and have been unemployed for little over one month. It’s not half as scary as everyone said it would be. I don’t have an infinite pool of money and I don’t have rich parents-husband-sponsor that will keep me living the good life forever without lifting a finger. BUT. I have taken time off life as I knew it. I have taken time for me, and I have ran away with myself, to ask myself all the questions and evaluate the answers, to get inspired, to see beautiful things, to have amazing encounters with people, to eat vegan cake, to talk with nature, with the sea, I know running away is highly criticised but I encourage everyone, at least one time in your life, to run away (as long as it is with yourself).

Energy! I don’t remember being as tired as I was through 2012 and 2013. In my whole life. Fatigue and tiredness that made me want to go back to bed the minute I woke up. My body had no energy most of the time. It was a large effort to keep me afloat and I managed ok but thanks to a strong will and a stubborn personality (together with some sugared-up cake). Yoga though was the best part of my day but it seemed like I was a boat, with a leak, and I was sinking. Most times I just wanted to go to bed. In the last month I have slept long and deep. I have taken naps. I have stocked up on energy and I am learning to use it properly. I do not want to go back to bed right now. And that feels pretty awesome! The best is that I am able to share that with others. And I am also learning to differentiate tiredness with lack of energy.

I am truly grateful for all that I am living, and I am happy to share it with anyone who wants to know how I did it, to take this time, to set myself free, to “quit” and go, it was actually quite easy now that I think about it. If you’re thinking about it and want to ask me practical questions please do contact me. And if you feel like following my trip with images you can follow me on Instagram @igoyoga

Namaste!

Tamara

We all start on our first day

I am dedicating my blog post today to someone dear to me because yesterday she completed her first day as a vegetarian ever. I would like to think I didn’t have anything to do with her decision but I did. I have been pestering her incessantly with recipes, the benefits of a vegan/veggie diet, the perks of not eating bacon wrapped in bacon and the advantages of eating healthy, while still enjoying eating. It’s not that I WANT her to be a vegetarian, but I would like her, and everyone around me though, to feel as good as I feel. I must admit that it feels right to acknowledge that I was wrong back then, when I used to be a carnivore, and when I said I will never stop eating ribs and bacon, I was wrong, and I am happy I was wrong.

I get a lot of comments about being a veg, especially “how do you do it? I would die”. First let me tell you, NO, you won’t die. In fact you might even live longer. Not that anything is granted in this life but why not give it a try? That’s my teasing line, just, why not give it a try. It might be for a week, or a month, or 2 months. And see how it goes, maybe you’ll feel good, maybe not, you’re free to decide, but you can’t say you can’t until you try it. When to do it, when to start? Well, I would say don’t do it on the day of the dinner that your friend organised at the Ribs all-you-can-eat place downtown. I mean, help yourself a little. Do it on a weekend, you’ll have time to shop, cook, eat slowly. Do it without telling other people, just start your day and choose the veggie option at the restaurant, get fresh stuff from the market and avoid the roasted chicken stand. Don’t make it a big deal because you’ll feel the pressure, remember you’re just trying it out. It can be over whenever you want, and no one will punish you if you go back to eating the other stuff. This is something you do for yourself and yourself only. I won’t get the benefits of you being a vegetarian. I will be happy if you feel happy. That’s it. And if you don’t want to try because you’re scared or anxious about the first day, well just remember everything you started you started on the first day. Same thing that I tell the newcomers at the yoga studio. We all started on our first day. When I tell students to relax sometime they tell me “Yes, you say that because you already know everything about it”. Well, I don’t know everything about nothing. I know some things, and I have some experience. But the first day that I showed up at the studio I didn’t know any of that, and I took my first Ashtanga class as a newbie (even though I had tried other kinds of yoga). And guess what, there has not been any record yet of a person who showed up for the first time at an Ashtanga Yoga class (or any other style) who already knew everything. This is official information taken from the World Records of the Yoga People (WRYP*). I can assure you, it’s legit 😉

So, the same way we start our first day of school, or first day of work, the first day of being a mother, or the first day of being a teacher, a vegetarian or a vegan, enjoy that first time, enjoy not knowing anything and discovering something. Listen to yourself, ask yourself questions, find the positive in this new experience.

 

Yesterday at an event I saw a colleague and asked her if she’d be eating soon as the catering had come out and the smell of the deep-fried shrimp filled the air and our nostrils. She said nuh-uh. I told her, yeah I’m not eating either. She asked why? I told her, well, I eat other stuff. She looked at me and said: are you a vegan? I said yes, well, I am a tolerant vegan, and avoid most things that are actually being served right now! We spent an hour talking recipes and food, with the occasional stop on the global warming subject and the CO2 emissions, the fishing industry problems and the extinction of the species. Unavoidable once you start talking green. I was happy to find someone at work that doesn’t ask me “All you eat is salad?”.

So, congrats to my friend who tried being a vegetarian whether it lasts 24hrs or 24 years, and thumbs up for opening her mind and exploring the uncomfortable zone of the vegetable fajitas, the spinach lasagna and the portobello burgers! I am up for sharing my veg diet with anyone interested in looking at my weekly menu ideas. Just shout!

 

Namaste, and bon appetit!

 

 

 

Every day a deadline…

When I planned leaving the country I just knew it would be painful in many ways. I knew I would spend a lot of time sorting out things, clothes, papers, memories, feelings, people. I knew that administratively I would be in for a treat of countless hours at the foreigners office and I knew that there was no way around it. It had to be done for the greater good. I have tried to be organised, I have tried to take it one day at a time, I have tried to breathe-in-breathe-out and tried with all my gut to take it easy, but there’s just too much to do, too many things to move, too much paperwork to do, and so little time-slash-energy.

I have now moved into my second stop, temporary accommodation number two (one more to go before the third one (Germany) and before actually getting on that plane to Jakarta). Every time I move something tears inside me, is this really going to happen? I have 6 weeks to go, 58 days is more precise. My feelings are like the weather right now, mostly stormy and overcast with occasional openings in the horizon through which rainbows and sun shines all the way, really, reminding me that there’s light at the end of the tunnel, and it’s NOT a train.

I push myself too hard and I don’t easily recognize when my body is giving signs of STOP. Last week I worked a tradeshow from Monday to Thursday in the Netherlands, at the end of the day I drove to Belgium and directly joined the bday dinner of a dear friend of mine, after that I drove to the airport to drop-off the rental car I had for the week, I went home at 2am and woke up the next morning to try a Mysore class. When I arrived to the first Chatturanga I realised both my wrists were extremely swollen and could not practice like this, I adjusted my whole practice accordingly and it was tough. Right after that I went to get the keys of my new/temporary place, and then moved half of my stuff over, all the way to the 5th floor (no lift). No wonder I spent the next 2 days in bed with a migraine and  feeling like I had been ran over by a truck. But still I asked myself, what’s going on? I hereby reply to myself: what’s going on? seriously? well I am running on low battery trying to accomplish all humanly possible and more, meeting deadlines and keeping a social life, eating questionably and sleeping poorly. What’s going on? seriously? 

The problem is that every day is a deadline, every day I have to mail something, print something, send something, call a thousand someones, call them back, get papers, process requests, etc. The car, the flat, the cable contract, the mobile company, the parking tickets (yeah lucky me), the police reports, the immigration file…  I feel like leaving this country is a full time job in itself. And I know, I know: think of the palm trees and the soft warm breeze of Bali. But still. Argh.

So right now, I am telling myself that if every day there is a paperwork war, a deadline invasion, an administrative conspiracy, then every day I am going to be a warrior. Every single day I am going to wake up and kick some. And then I am going to stop, for a little bit, and breathe and think of the palm trees. And do my downdogs, and my warrior poses, and my bow poses. And I am going to let the rest wait until the day after, until there’s space, until there’s time, without burning out.

Today I feel inspired by warrior pose, such a strong demonstration of our own shields, our own drive, with warrior pose I tell the world that I am coming, that I am not afraid, that I am up for whatever comes my way, I tell the world that I am standing tall. Be a warrior every day. 

Image

Namaste